New Perfume Review Trudon Parfums Elae and Medie- Summer Sunbeams

Two years ago when premiere candle makers Cire Trudon finally entered the liquid fragrance game with Trudon Parfums it was an event. The original five perfumes were memorable for not trying to check boxes. Creative director Julien Pruvost wanted to have Trudon Parfums stand out by not following trends. I concluded my reviews of those perfumes looking forward to what was next. Two years later M. Pruvost has my answer with Trudon Parfums Elae and Medie.

Julien Pruvost

M. Pruvost works with perfumer Yann Vasnier again after creating Mortel in the debut collection. This time the pair of perfumes are evocations of summer effulgence. M. Vasnier pushes both perfumes to embrace the saturated brightness of late summer.

Yann Vasnier

In Elae M. Vasnier creates a heady floral. He could hardly do otherwise by making tuberose his keynote. Before the white flower makes its entrance, he uses a snappy fruit top accord of apple and neroli to set the scene. Neroli acts as harbinger of its louder sister tuberose. The apple provides a crisp fruit which will push back at the creaminess of the tuberose. The floral diva is shrouded in a stole of benzoin and akigalawood in the base. The benzoin adds snuggly warmth while the akigalawood adds a spicy contrast.

Elae has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

Medie is a fresh summery citrus perfume modulated with spices. M. Vasnier uses grapefruit as his citrus focal point. I enjoy the choice because grapefruit carries a sulfurous undertone along with the bright fruitiness. M. Vasnier uses the spicy woody chemical Pepperwood to tease out that pungency. It adds depth to what would have otherwise been a typical citrus top accord. The clean woody lines of cypress and cedar provide guardrails for the citrus as it heads towards the base. Awaiting it there is Akigalawood and incense. If there is a commonality between both Elae and Medie it is the Akigalawood. In Medie it continues the synthetic spicy beat begun by the Pepperwood. The incense adds a silvery resinous sheen to it all.

Medie has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

 I am very pleased that M. Pruvost is taking time between releases. Elae and Medie seem the better for it. If you need a little summer sunbeam as the world around you cools Elae and Medie offer two versions.

Disclosure: this review is based on samples provided by Trudon Parfums.

Mark Behnke

New Perfumes Review Trudon Parfums II (Deux), Olim, and Revolution (Part 2) – Earthworks

I introduced the perfumes from famed candle maker Cire Trudon yesterday in Part 1. Today I am going to focus on three of the five done by the same perfumer. Longtime Executive Director for Cire Trudon, Julien Pruvost, must have spent some time deciding which perfumers would be best to translate the candle into perfume. The perfumer he chose to do three of them is Lyn Harris. I was surprised to see her as the signatory for these fragrances because up until now she has been the Harris part of the niche brand Miller Harris which was one of the original niche perfume brands. I own quite a few of these and her style is distinct to that brand. What I found interesting here is it seems like M. Pruvost found ways to shade that style into something more befitting a brand going from solid to liquid. The three perfumes they collaborated on form what I think of as the Earth trio of the Trudon Parfums Collection.

Julien Pruvost

II or Deux is Ms. Harris’ ode to pine. When I was reading the note list this was the one I expected to smell like a candle. What I found once I wore it was this was the least like that as Deux is a pine tree with the sap oozing from its bark. A sharp green leafy accord summons the pine made more so by black pepper. This makes it seem a bit like the earth floor is rising to the pine then juniper berry provides the foundation of the “sap” accord which incense slowly tunes into you can see the amber droplets against the wood. The woodiness and the sap rise at the same pace until they fade away. I really have enjoyed this through the first few cool mornings of fall.

II (Deux) has 10-12 hour longevity and average sillage.

Lyn Harris

There are sometimes sniffing something on paper gives me a false impression. That’s what happened with Olim. On paper this comes off a bit jumbled as if it was a pileup on the freeway. On skin this turns into a slowly developing study of spice and resins. It begins with a fougere accord of lavender and anise which is what lingers on the skin as slowly spices add to it as clove, and baie rose take their time evolving the lavender. This all becomes very earthy as equally languidly patchouli grounds all of this to the level that you feel like there are tiny grains of topsoil nestled in the sprig of lavender. The warm combination of myrrh and benzoin begin to move the patchouli out front as an earthy accord forms over the final hours.

Olim has 12-14 hour longevity and moderate sillage.

If you’re going to call a perfume Revolution and you’re talking about the French Revolution while you’re known for making candles; this is where you expect to find the smoke behind the fire. Except the fire here is that from muskets. Revolution is really all about the cordite and cobblestone accord in its base. Before we get there Ms. Harris sets the scene with some elemi and angelica seeds. It is the scrubbed clean smell of the cobblestone street prior to the first shot being fired. Ms. Harris then composes an accord that captures the street material and the smoke floating above it. Cade oil, incense, and opopanax form the smell of gunpowder after its been fired. It is one of those odd real-life smells I really like. Ms. Harris has found it here. Then patchouli, papyrus, and labdanum capture the uneven pavement misted with a veil of dew to display a version of earth which is made up of stones put together to form a road.

Revolution has 12-14 hour longevity and moderate sillage.

In conclusion the five perfumes making up the Trudon Parfums Collection are a quite strong debut. I am very much looking forward to what comes next from M. Pruvost and his perfume line.

Disclosure: This review was based on samples provided by Trudon Parfums.

Mark Behnke

New Perfumes Review Trudon Parfums Bruma and Mortel (Part 1)- Solstice Twilight

As I’ve mentioned multiple times I’m not a candle guy. Although because I write about fragrances I get a few sent to me anyway. Of all the ones I’ve received there was one which even I could tell was at the pinnacle of quality; Cire Trudon. I know at the time I wondered how interesting it would be for the creative mind behind the candles, Executive Director Julien Pruvost, turned to perfumes of the liquid kind. With the release of the first five perfumes in the Trudon Parfums collection we see if the waxen brilliance can be translated to something without a wick.

Julien Pruvost

A couple of things which pleased me before I even spritzed a drop. Mr. Pruvost kept the first set of releases to five. Another positive is there is no desire to make sure they check every box on the style of perfumes checklist. These five span the deeper part of the perfumed spectrum. Finally, he chose to work with only three perfumers. Lyn Harris did three; Deux, Mortel, and Olim. Those three have an interesting coherence when taken together which is why I’ll cover them in Part 2 tomorrow. For today I’m going to look at the other two; Bruma and Mortel.

Antoine Lie

Bruma was composed by Antoine Lie. Bruma is translated as “solstice” from Latin. Solstice is also either the shortest day or night of the year; Bruma looks for the light before the darkness arrives. M. Lie embodies his daylight with beautifully rooty iris without a hint of powder. It is kept illuminated by peony, lavender, and jasmine. It is that last ray of sun expressed in iris. The darkness comes forward in a gorgeously constructed leather accord it wraps the sunny florals in a cloak of twilight. Vetiver comes along to extinguish the light leaving the earthier aspects of the orris as the remains of the day.

Bruma has 10-12 hour longevity and moderate sillage.

Yann Vasnier

Mortel was composed by Yann Vasnier. M. Vasnier is also playing with themes of shadow and light but Mortel is more twilight than one or the other. It has been a long time since I have tried a new incense perfume as good as Mortel. It was my first love in niche perfumery which Mortel reminded me of. Great incense has a shimmery metallic covering over the resinous core. The incense M. Vasnier chooses is all of that. He spices it up with black pepper, nutmeg, and allspice. They blend in adding shadow to the slightly monolithic nature of the incense. That solidity gets broken down even more as the sweetness of myrrh and benzoin modulate the chilly frankincense into a softer warmer resin accord as the shadows deepen.

Mortel has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

Both Bruma and Mortel are excellent fragrance representatives of this most esteemed of candle brands.

I’ll return tomorrow with reviews of the other three.

Disclosure: This review was based on samples provided by Trudon Parfums.

Mark Behnke