New Perfume Review Bottega Veneta Parco Palladiano XV Salvia Blu- Soliflores Aren’t Easy Revisited

If you’re reading this review and feel like you have read it before; you have. Bottega Veneta has been one of the better designer brands to make the transition to mainstream perfumes. Two years ago, they decided to release a different collection called Parco Palladiano.

Tomas Maier

Creative director Tomas Maier was inspired by Italian architect Andrea Palladio’s 16th century villa in Vicenze called La Rotonda. Parco Palladiano is meant to be a collection featuring one of the things growing around the villa. Over nine releases that desire to make a soliflore has been pushed to a literal extreme as most of the collection is just what the bottle promises and nothing else. There might be a few different extracts layered together but overall most of the collection never moves beyond that. The only one which captured my attention from the first nine was Parco Palladiano V because besides sage it also had laurel and rosemary to help make the sage a soaring aromatic.

Quentin Bisch

When I received the six newest additions to the collection I felt the same way I had when experiencing the others. X is a woody olive tree. XI is woody chestnut. XII is woody oak. Sense a theme yet? XIII is the smell of grass. XIV is pomegranate. That is all there is with nothing else. If you like those smells and want a perfume which never changes while you are wearing it; they are well-done just terribly boring to me for not allowing supplementary ingredients to show off the keynote.

In what is an odd bit of symmetry I am again drawn to only one of these new releases XV Salvia Blu. It is also meant to be a soliflore of sage. It is also bracketed by two supplementary notes which provide a softer presence than in V. Perfumer Quentin Bisch makes a soliflore which has more to it than the central ingredient.

As it was in V the sage is present right away, but its greener aspects are more muted for a fresher aromatic scent. Lavender complements and amplifies this effect as its dual nature of herbal and floral meshes with the sage. As this is happening on one side a spicy rose is also arriving on the other side. As the florals appear the sage becomes more extroverted pushing the florals to the background. This is where XV stays for hours.

Parco Palladiano XV has 8-10 hour longevity and average sillage.

Fifteen entries in I am guessing I am not the intended audience and there is a desire for this kind of single ingredient perfumery. As the only two which I enjoyed also had to contain something besides the sage keynote. Just goes to support my hypothesis from the first Parco Palladiano review; soliflores aren’t easy.

Disclosure: this review is based on samples provided by Bottega Veneta.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Van Cleef & Arpels Neroli Amara- Princess Neroli

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As the weather gets warmer there also comes with it a desire for simplicity. It is the time of year my linear style of perfumes receives the most use. It is generally because once it gets hot the simple beauty of a great ingredient done well is just the right choice. Van Cleef & Arpels Neroli Amara uses neroli in just this way.

This kind of style of perfume has become a staple of the Van Cleef & Arpels Collection Extaordinaire. When it gets it correct these become perfume still lifes featuring a single ingredient. For Neroli Amara perfumer Quentin Bisch was asked to do this with neroli.

Quentin Bisch

The name of the perfume and the brief is inspired by the real-life Princess of Nerola. In 1675 when she married to the Prince of Nerola she found the province north of Rome covered with Amara Orange trees. The story goes that the Princess scented her clothes with orange blossom, adding them to her gloves. The scent would become so entwined with her it would become the etymology of the perfume ingredient neroli. M. Bisch captures a regal version of neroli in Neroli Amara.

Neroli Amara opens on a top accord of citrus. It is as if M. Bisch wanted to have every citrus note pay court to the princess to come. Then like an announcement trumpet a bit of baie rose commands the citrus to calm down. Over the next few minutes the neroli rises in presence. The princess has arrived. M. Bisch has black pepper and petitgrain escort her to the throne. The neroli chosen is all of what I enjoy in the ingredient; a soft citrus-like floral atop an astringent green underpinning. The use of the petitgrain, in particular, focuses the neroli more towards the floral but the green is also a presence. Much later on there is a bit of light woody cypress but by then the princess has retired to the palace.

Neroli Amara has 6-8 hour longevity and average sillage.

This is one of the least complex perfumes I have encountered by M. Bisch. That’s not a bad thing it just means if you have come to expect something innovative from him Neroli Amara isn’t that. It is a perfumer showing off his still life of Princess Neroli; in this case that is more than enough.

Disclosure: this review is based on a sample provided by Van Cleef & Arpels.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Chloe Nomade- Break Point

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When a perfume brand has been around for awhile I begin to think I know what to expect, 99 times out of 100 I am correct. No brand has gone out of business by giving consumers variations of already successful releases. It is a fact of life in the mass-market sector. Which means when I get a sample of a new release from a brand like Chloe I expect a variation on fresh and floral. The latest spring release for 2018 showed me something different.

The new fragrance is called Chloe Nomade composed by perfumer Quentin Bisch. His aim is to produce a fruity chypre but before he can get there he also needs to nod to the fresh floral DNA of the brand. While doing that he also departs from the formula throughout the rest of Nomade to provide a different kind of Chloe experience.

Quentin Bisch

Nomade is a simple construction where with a flare of citrus M. Bisch opens the perfume on a duet of plum and freesia. The freesia is that simple spring floral which is found throughout the Chloe collection. It is next to a rich plum fully faceted with skin, tart pulp and woody stone. M. Bisch takes the plum as an equal to the freesia for a short time before the plum emerges on its own. Then to fulfil the chypre part a low-Atranol oakmoss steps up, providing more green than bite. This is the legacy of using the modern version of oakmoss. What works in Nomade is the lush plum settles into the green mossy embrace seamlessly revealing a modern fruity chypre over the long run on my skin.

Nomade has 10-12 hour longevity and average sillage.

Nomade is a significant departure from the typical Chloe release. Once the freesia is gone the plum and oakmoss is as far from fresh and floral as you can get. It will be interesting to see if longtime Chloe fragrance aficionados like it. Also, whether those, like me, who think they know what a Chloe perfume smells like give it a chance to break through. That Chloe has taken a risk is laudable and I hope it pays off.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample provided by Sephora.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Ex Nihilo French Affair- The Maltese Chypre

The first time I became aware of the word “chypre” came while I was reading the classic detective novel “The Maltese Falcon” by Dashiell Hammett. One of the habits I had when reading was if I ran across a word that I didn’t know I’d try to infer it from context followed by opening the paperback dictionary I carried with me. The very last sentence in the paragraph which described the character Joel Cairo was, “The fragrance of chypre came with him.” In my mind I pronounced it ki-per while the context made me think it was perfume. The entry in the dictionary said it was “a non-alcoholic perfume containing oils and resins”. While the pronunciation instructed me to say sheep-ra. Years later as I truly became fascinated with perfume I would think back to how inadequate that definition is.

Quentin Bisch

Chypres have been one of the most interesting style of fragrance from the moment I began to care about understanding more. They have evolved, and every great perfumer has their version of it. The new generation has been working with material restrictions while creating innovative new chypre accords. Occasionally the young guns get the chance to go back and try and make a chypre like they used to. For Ex Nihilo French Affair perfumer Quentin Bisch takes his opportunity.

Ex Nihilo Team (l. to r.) Olivier Royere, Sylvie Loday, Benoit Verdier

M. Bisch wears his love of perfumery out in the open. There is no doubt that he adores everything about its history and his part in the future of it. I would have enjoyed hearing the conversation when creative directors Sylvie Loday, Olivier Royere, and Benoit Verdier asked him for an old-fashioned chypre for the “new Dandies” of the 21st century. Which is what the brief for French Affair seems to be. M. Bisch decided the base was going to be as traditional a chypre accord as he could produce. Where he would innovate is in the top and heart accords leading to that base.

If there is an ingredient which is becoming a bit of a M. Bisch fingerprint it might be lychee which he uses to add some off-kilter sweetness to the more typical bergamot. It still has that lens flare kind of quality but through a kind of musty sweet. I like it a lot as it is a contemporary twist on that most pedestrian citrus opening. Slicing through the sweetness like a razor is violet leaves which cut straight through to a lush rose in the heart. Its dewy floral depths hold the focus until the patchouli, oakmoss, and vetiver which form M. Bisch’s chypre accord rise up. The rose and violet leaves fall right in line as the earthy patchouli, the bitter oakmoss, and the sharp woody green of vetiver combine into a classic chypre accord. This is perfume classicism at its best.

French Affair has 10-12 hour longevity and above average sillage. It could get you a line in a novel if you wear too much.

M. Bisch’s enthusiasm is contagious and given the opportunity with French Affair he delivered his version of classic chypre brilliantly. So much so that if there is a remake of The Maltese Falcon in 2018 San Francisco this is the perfume that Joel Cairo should be wearing.

Disclosure: this review is based on a sample provided by Ex Nihilo.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Betty Barclay Pure Pastel Mint- Color Not Herb

In the early days of the internet and my participation on the fragrance forums I was deep in the throes of acquisition syndrome i.e. Gotta Have Them All. I chased all over the world looking for things that sounded interesting. Nowadays I am fortunate to be able to have many brands who send things to me but not everything. The network I created back in the beginning still exists and when I want to track something down I can still do it. I activated it to get a new perfume released in Europe because it was done by one of my favorite young perfumers. It took a couple of months but the bottle of Betty Barclay Pure Pastel Mint arrived.

Betty Barclay seems to be a mass-market fashion and beauty line. They’ve been producing fragrance since 1994. Pure Pastel Mint is the twenty-fifth perfume for the brand. Pure Pastel Mint was paired with another fragrance Pure Pastel Lemon. These were released as springtime fresh releases. What piqued my interest was the involvement of perfumer Quentin Bisch for Pure Pastel Mint. Those who read my reviews regularly know I have issues with mint in perfume and its unfortunate association with my daily dental routine. Besides trying another of M. Bisch’s works I was equally intrigued because the mint referred to on the label was not the herb it was the color as promised in the name. I have mentioned in the past that I am not a synesthete where I experience color in conjunction with fragrance. So that component also drew me to wanting to try this. Could M. Bisch make me experience color over herb?

Quentin Bisch

In the early moments of Pure Pastel Mint M. Bisch uses yuzu matched with baie rose and blackcurrant buds. Yuzu is lemon with green undercurrent. Blackcurrant buds are raspberry with a similar shading while baie rose adds an herbal effect. This is where I can most easily see a pastel mint color occurring as M. Bisch forms his top accord. Of course, this being a spring scent rose must be in the heart, and it is. Cyclamen adds dew drops, ylang-ylang adds brightness with the interesting twist coming by the addition of tea forming a figurative tea rose heart accord. The finale is a mixture of sandalwood and synthetic linear musk with an expansive musky-woody effect.

Pure Pastel mint has 8-10 hour longevity and average sillage.

My color-blind sense of smell really only got the color association in the early stages and not overwhelmingly so. I did find Pure Pastel Mint to be a nice take on the spring rose motif worth the effort in sourcing it.

Disclosure: this review is based on a bottle I purchased.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Parfums de Marly Delina- Floriental Gourmand

Parfums de Marly is not a brand which usually heads down the garden path with floral fragrances. They tend to work on the straight-up Oriental side of the street most often. Even the florals they have done have been Florientals. Up to this point it hasn’t been a strong suit because in some ways it didn’t feel like they had their heart in it. Which made it interesting that they decided to release their version of a spring rose. Just on past performance I would have had lowered expectations; Parfums de Marly Delina exceeded those expectations.

What also added to my interest was perfumer Quentin Bisch was composing his second perfume for the brand following on from 2015’s Carlisle. So far in M. Bisch’s short career he also hadn’t done one of these spring rose fragrances either. Which meant Delina might represent a benchmark for both brand and perfumer.

In M. Bisch’s perfumes to date if there is something which is becoming a hallmark it is adding an odd gourmand vibe. Delina gets this early on which helps freshen up what is a very common floral mixture in the heart.

Quentin Bisch

Delina opens with this offbeat gourmand note as M. Bisch employs lychee and its slightly musty sweetness. Bergamot is present to provide some structure. The real star in the early going is the rhubarb which adds a citrusy vegetal contrast to the lychee. Finally, to finish off the top accord some nutmeg breezes through it all. The florals appear; as muguet, rose, and peony provide that spring rose accord. M. Bisch uses a Turkish rose so there is a bit more depth but it is still a genteel rose. The Oriental base is made up of a few musks, cashmeran, and frankincense.

Delina has 8-10 hour longevity and average sillage.

This is the first fully successful floral from Parfums de Marly. Delina is different because of that lychee focused top accord which provides a different perspective on the typical garden rose fragrance. It seems these sweet floral gourmands are an ongoing trend. Delina is a great version within that genre.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample from Parfums de Marly.

Mark Behnke

Colognoisseur 2017 Hopes and Wishes

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As we put 2016 to bed it is time to look forward to 2017. I like to end every year with some things I am anticipating and/or hoping for to happen in the next twelve months.

C'mon Vero, Pretty Please?

A new perfume from Vero Kern. It has almost been three years since the release of Rozy. Vero has teased us a little bit that the next one is going to be a tobacco focused fragrance. I know it will come out when she feels it is ready but my inner five-year old is getting ready to wail if I lead off this piece in twelve months with the same wish.

I would like new brands to put fragrance over marketing. I went back and looked; 2016 was no worse for the number of brand debuts sporting upwards of six perfumes. What did seem to be worse was the pricing for perfumes where the money did not seem to be in the bottle. Please if you’re a brand-new brand focus on the perfume; make it great. Try and only do three or four perfumes. Don’t rush to the market.

Le Labo Counter at Tyson's Corner Mall in Virginia

More Le Labo, more places. There was a lot of worry over Estee Lauder’s acquisition of Le Labo. One of the things I have thought is necessary for niche perfume to really expand is more access. In my local mall, they installed a Le Labo counter in the local Nordstrom’s. When it first opened in April it was busy on every visit but nothing like it was on my Holiday visit. Le Labo is one of the exemplars of what it means to be a niche perfume. Estee Lauder taking it to the mall shows that consumers will gravitate to quality if it is right in front of them. I am hoping that this will be rolled out across the country in places where niche is not readily available.

I want a masterpiece from Perfumers: The Next Generation…all of them. Quentin Bisch, Cristiano Canali, Luca Maffei, Julien Rasquinet, and Cecile Zarokian are this set of next generation perfumers I think of as the next set of rule-breakers. They have all consistently stepped up their game over the last couple of years. I want 2017 to have a release from each of them that makes my choice for Perfume of the Year the most difficult it has ever been. Make it so!

I hope we found the ceiling. For the first time since I’ve been writing about perfume the number of new releases were about the same in 2016 as they were in 2015. I always believed there was a number where the market could not continue to expand beyond. 2017, if it stays about the same, can be the third data point which confirms this.

Can this Spring be about something other than rose? The last two years I have been buried by fresh clean rose perfumes for Spring. I can hope that maybe a new floral can take center stage. Jasmine, perhaps?

On this final day of 2016 I want to wish every single reader the Happiest and Healthiest of New Years. Colognoisseur has grown beyond the goals I set for myself back when I started almost three years ago. For that I must thank everyone who spends a couple minutes here reading my writing. I hope 2017 brings us even more perfumed joy.

Mark Behnke

Colognoisseur 2016 Year-End Review Part 1- Overview

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2016 will probably go down as a pivotal year in the perfume business. As an observer of much of the field this year I have seen change in almost every place I can see. Which leads me to believe it is also taking place behind the scenes where I am not able to know the entire story. Change like this can be unsettling which has made for some worrying trends but overall I think it has contributed to another excellent year. I smelled a little less this year than last year; 680 new perfumes versus 2015’s 686. Surprisingly the amount of new releases has also plateaued with 1566 new releases in 2016 versus 1676 last year. Maybe we have defined the amount of new perfume the market can bear. Over the next three days I will share my thoughts on the year coming to an end.

We are told in Ecclesiastes, or by The Byrds if you prefer; “To every thing there is a season” and so it is in perfume as the season of the Baby Boomers has ended and the Millennials have taken over. This younger generation is now larger, has more discretionary income, and is spending more on perfume than the Boomers are per multiple sources. While the public at large was made aware of it this year the industry could see the change coming a year, or more, prior. What that meant for 2016 as far as fragrance went was every corporate perfume entity was on a fishing expedition to see if they could be the one who lured this group of consumers towards them. The drive for this is huge because lifelong brand loyalties can be formed right now within this group. Certainly, the enduring trends of the next few years in fragrance will be determined by where they spend their money. All of that has made 2016 fascinating because at the end of the year that answer is no clearer than it was at the beginning. The prevailing themes, based on what was provided to them, is they want lighter in sillage and aesthetic, gourmand, and different. That last category is the ephemeral key I think. The brand which can find them in the place where they Periscope, Snapchat, and Instagram is going to have an advantage.

Christine Nagel (l.) and Olivier Polge

There was also generational change taking place at two of the most prestigious perfume brands, Hermes and Chanel. The new in-house perfumers for both took full control in 2016. Christine Nagel released Hermes Eau du Rhubarbe Ecarlate and Galop D’Hermes. Olivier Polge released Chanel Boy and Chanel No. 5 L’Eau. This shows both talented artists know how to take an existing brand aesthetic and make it their own.

Cecile Zarokian, Quentin Bisch, Luca Maffei (l. to r.)

The next generation of perfumers exemplified by Cecile Zarokian, Quentin Bisch, and Luca Maffei loomed large this year. Mme Zarokian did thirteen new releases in 2016 all of them distinctively delightful from the re-formulation of Faths Essentials Green Water to the contemporary Oriental Puredistance Sheiduna. M. Bisch brilliantly reinvented one of the masterpieces of perfume in Thierry Mugler Angel Muse. Sig. Maffei released ten new fragrances with Masque Milano L’Attesa, Laboratorio Olfattivo MyLO, and Jul et Mad Secrets du Paradis Rouge showcasing his range. 

There were also fascinating collaborations this year. Antonio Gardoni and Bruno Fazzolari contributed Cadavre Exquis an off-beat gourmand. Josh Meyer and Sam Rader conspired to create a Northern California Holiday bonfire in Dasein Winter Nights. Victor Wong the owner and creative director of Zoologist Perfumes was able to get the most out of independent perfumers like Ellen Covey in Bat and Sarah McCartney in Macaque.

Some of the independent perfumers I look to surprisingly released perfumes which did not please me. Thankfully there were new ones who stepped up to fill in the gap. Lesli Wood Peterson of La Curie, Ludmila and Antoine Bitar of Ideo Parfumeurs, and Eugene & Emrys Au of Auphorie did that. Chritsti Meshell of House of Matriarch made an ambitious economic move into Nordstrom while producing two of my favorites from her in Albatross and Kazimi.

The mainstream sector had another strong year as the mall continues to have diamonds hidden amongst the dross. In 2016 that meant Elizabeth & James Nirvana Bourbon, Alford & Hoff No. 3, SJP Stash, Prada Infusion de Mimosa, Thierry Mugler Angel Muse, and Chanel No. 5 L’Eau were there to be found.

If the beginning of the year was all about rose the overall year was a renaissance for neroli perfumes. Jean-Claude Ellena’s swan song for Hermes; Eau de Neroli Dore. The afore mentioned Green Water along with Jo Malone Basil & Neroli and Hiram Green Dilettante showed the versatility of the note.

The acquisition of niche brands continued with Estee Lauder buying By Kilian and L’Oreal doing the same with Atelier Cologne. The acquisitions of Frederic Malle and Le Labo, two years ago, seem to have been positive steps for both brands. Especially seeing Le Labo in my local mall getting such a positive reception made me believe that if the good niche brands can become more available the consumer will appreciate the difference.

Tomorrow I will name my Perfume, Perfumer, Creative Director, and Brand of the Year

The next day I will reveal my Top 25 New Releases of 2016.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Etat Libre D’Orange Attaquer Le Soleil Marquis de Sade- The Lash of Cistus

Marquis de Sade is a historical figure who suffers from the titillation aspect of his life having too much influence on his stature. People tend to focus on the sexuality which has been derived from his name. The thing I learned about de Sade when reading his writings is he was a proponent of the freedom to do everything. The term for that was “libertine”. His belief was you become a deeper human being by experiencing as much as you can. This includes facing the things we are not fond of, on an abstract level. If you face what you believe is unpleasant you might find something illuminating within the experiment. Despite the focus on the fetishism M. de Sade’s philosophy is as embraced by extreme sports people who dive off mountains in flight suits as those who explore their sexuality through the dichotomy of pain and pleasure.

etienne_de_swardt

Etienne de Swardt

If I was going to tell you that a perfume brand was going to use M. de Sade as an inspiration I would expect many wouldn’t go too far down their list of possibilities before naming Etat Libre D’Orange. Creative Director Etienne de Swardt is known for his brand using sexuality as part of its image. You might think a perfume based on M. de Sade from Etat Libre D’Orange would be all slap and tickle with a sly wink. Instead one should also be reminded that the brand has the ultimate fragrance which asks a perfume lover to face the unpleasant, Secretions Magnifique, and perhaps find the beauty. I know I have probably spent large amounts of time with this specific fragrance. Through that study I have probably learned as much about perfumery as any other. For this new fragrance called Attaquer Le Soleil (Attack The Sun) M. de Swardt tasked one of the most talented young perfumers working today to take on an ingredient they find unpleasant while using it in a fragrance. Perfumer Quentin Bisch took on this brief by choosing to make a perfume based on cistus.

quentinbiscgh

Quentin Bisch

Cistus is the main ingredient of that more commonly known raw material labdanum. Labdanum is the resin that forms on the plant. It has a very green resinous quality often compared to a balsamic nature. M. Bisch has never used the material as a focal point because he disliked it. For Attaquer Le Soleil he decided to not just go for the resin. Givaudan has extracted almost every part of the cistus plant and M. Bisch took these different variations combining them into Attaquer Le Soleil.

This makes Attaquer Le Soleil, in essence, a labdanum soliflore which is supported by the rest of the plant. By having the other sources of cistus, leaves, branches, and flower it has the effect of making it more intense while also making it kinetic in scope. Early on it smells more like a pine tree. It warms into a balsamic simmer that eventually becomes leathery in character. It all converges on the more familiar labdanum by the final hours.

Attaquer Le Soleil has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

Much like M. Bisch whether you like Attaquer Le Soleil will come down to how much you like labdanum. Labdanum is an ingredient I like which allowed me to just relax and enjoy Attaquer Le Soleil experiencing the pleasure of a resinous soliflore. If you want to embrace your inner libertine while experiencing labdanum and cistus in all of its glory, then allow M. Bisch to lash you with cistus.

Disclosure: This review was based on a sample provided by Etat Libre D’Orange.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Maison Martin Margiela Replica Soul of the Forest- M. Bisch’s Chypre

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There are so many young talented perfumers working within the industry now it makes it an exciting time for me to be writing about them. One of the more fascinating things to watch is as they begin to interpret classical perfume architectures. The one style which allows a perfumer to break new ground is in designing a modern chypre. Due to restrictions on the traditional materials any perfumer approaches the design of a new chypre thinking about how to design accords which can approximate the proscribed materials. Thus, it gives a perfumer wide latitude to do their thing. Quentin Bisch is one of those young stars I admire. With the release of Martin Margiela Replica Soul of the Forest we see M. Bisch’s version of a chypre.

Chypres are all about the namsake base. That base is composed of oakmoss, patchouli and musk. That accord provides a bitingly woody earthy base to contrast with whatever bright notes were used in the top accord. The only problem is in current times oakmoss is restricted to using the version which has had atranol removed. Musks have also undergone multiple restrictions over the years also requiring a perfumer to find ways to put back what regulators have removed. Or a perfumer can make up their own accord using entirely different materials. That is what M. Bisch has chosen to do with Soul of the Forest.

Quentin Bisch

Quentin Bisch

Soul of the Forest is what would be described as a fruity chypre. M. Bisch uses a mixture of blackcurrant buds and pimento beries. They are unusual choices but they do provide an alternative to the more ubiquitous citrus or berry infused chypre openings. The combination of blackcurrant buds and pimento form a faux-cherry accord which reminds me of ripe cherries on the tree. It is a fleeting accord as M. Bisch wants to get to building his chypre accord. He chucks both the oakmoss and the musks out the window. Instead he retains the patchouli using that as the nucleus to form the base. The complementary notes include balsam, cistus, and atlas cedar. All three of those provide components of the familiar chypre but it is the choice of an intense Somalian frankincense which seals the deal. M. Bisch uses this to bring the bite; helped significantly with the cedar providing a shoulder to lean upon. This comes together in a magnificent resinous rush.

Soul of the Forest has 8-10 hour longevity and average sillage.

Soul of the Forest is lighter in nature than the classic chypres. That lightness is one part of what makes it appealing to me but if a chypre must carry a certain kind of intensity it might not measure up for other aficionados of the style. I have spent much of 2016 lost in the imaginative constructs of young perfumers. Soul of the Forest allowed me to see M. Bisch’s chypre.

Disclosure: this review was based on a sample from Maison Martin Margiela.

Mark Behnke