New Perfume Review Byredo Bibliotheque- Language Envy

There are times I have language envy. What I mean by that is other languages have words for things I like more than the English word for them. When I was taking Spanish classes in school in S. Florida the word for library might have been my first instance of language envy. As a child, the library was the place where my mind was opened to the possibilities. When Sr. Dowdy, my Spanish teacher, said that “la biblioteca” was the word for library that felt like such a better word to me. So, I appropriated it. When I would be running out the door I’d yell over my shoulder “off to the biblioteca”. I don’t know which came first but the French word is very similar “bibliotheque”.  Now there is a perfume carrying the French version of the name, Byredo Bibliotheque.

Ben Gorham

Bibliotheque came about from a rare reversal as it lived its first incarnation as a candle at Byredo. Apparently, it got a lot of requests to be made into a perfume. Creative Director Ben Gorham and perfumer Jerome Epinette worked on the transformation from solid to liquid.

If you are looking for a fragrance which captures the smell of ink, paper, leather, and wood of a classic library; Bibliotheque is not that. At least not entirely. There are some aspects of that but early on it is a fruity floral construct which eventually gives way to that library accord. What I liked about that early fruity floral phase is M. Epinette makes the keynotes so effusive it is like encountering them minutes before they make that transition from ripe to rot.

Jerome Epinette

M. Epinette opens Bibliotheque with a fruit combination of peach and plum. They are so ready to burst they throw off gentle aldehydes around their inherent deep fruity nature. I am not usually a fan of these kind of fruit accords but this time it worked for me. Probably because the floral counterpart was also equally engaging. Peony and violet are those notes and they provide a contralto version of floralcy that harmonizes with the fruits. Finally, the library accord begins to form. I am guessing a patchouli fraction is being used by M. Epinette to form the dry paper and ink aspect. A transparent leather accord is also here along with an equally delicate woodiness. The base accord is much lighter than the fruity floral one that preceded it.

Bibliotheque has 10-12 hour longevity and moderate sillage.

I do like the fragrances which are out there which have captured the empty library milieu. Yet I might like the fragrance Bibliotheque in the same way I prefer the word. The reason is that fruity floral opening seems full of possibilities as ideas can be balanced on the edge of realization or disregard. Bibliotheque captures the world where those ideas come to light.

Disclosure: This review was based ona sample provided by Byredo.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Atelier Cologne Clementine California- The Cologne Welcome Mat

If there has been one thing I have done the most over the time I’ve been running Colognoisseur it has been to recommend Atelier Cologne. One of the difficult things for me is to receive an e-mail from a reader letting me know they want to give this niche perfume world a try but they live outside of the major US cities. Most consumers want to know if they are going to pay more that they personally can tell, and appreciate, the difference between mainstream and niche. My answer has been, more often than not, to head to their local mall; go to Sephora, and get a sample of Atelier Cologne. Most of the time I receive a follow-up from those who do see the difference. There are some who have replied that they like what they smelled but it was “too strong”. Even when I show visitors niche perfumes that is a common refrain, as well.

What that means is a perfume brand needs a fragrance which acts as a welcome mat to allow a consumer to take a smaller step from the mainstream into a different style of perfumery. I think the most recent release from Atelier Cologne called Clementine California will be that perfume for the brand. One of the reasons I think this will become important is if the recent acquisition by L’Oreal comes with a plan to expand the availability even more; Clementine California can become the brand ambassador.

Sylvie Ganter-Cervasel and Christophe Cervasel

Clementine California is still the Cologne Absolue for which the brand started by Sylvie Ganter-Cervasel and Christophe Cervasel pioneered. Jerome Epinette is once again the perfumer. Clementine California is a sparkling citrus cologne. All of this is part of the brand DNA. What is different is this is, seemingly by design, the most easygoing Atelier Cologne ever.

To achieve this affability M. Epinette uses a very traditional cologne spine of citrus, spice, and woods. Only in a few places is there a different twist to that classic cologne recipe which is what makes it a small step towards niche.

Jerome Epinette

The opening is a sun-drenched citrus mix of clementine and mandarin. Then M. Epinette tints it green with juniper. This is the technique he will use throughout by adding a green facet to each accord. In the heart star anise and Szechuan pepper provide the spice component which is turned greener by basil. The base is sandalwood and cypress providing a woody alternative to the more commonly used cedar. M. Epinette adds vetiver for the last bit of green.

Clementine California has 8-10 hour longevity and average sillage.

From the very first moment I smelled Clementine California I believed this is the cologne which can put its arm around your shoulder while you step over the threshold into a different fragrance world. I am looking forward to recommending this to the next person to send me an e-mail.

Disclosure: This review was based on a sample provided by Atelier Cologne.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review MAC Shadescents Ruby Woo- The Red Leather Diaries

I know for many who love perfume they have an equivalent passion for makeup. I am obviously not one who falls in to that particular categorization. I am not so clueless that I don’t know most of the major brands plus if they decide to expand in to fragrance I become even better acquainted with the brand. I knew about MAC cosmetics because they always seem to have a lot of space in the department store beauty aisles. I can figure out that to have that much square footage must translate to a passionate consumer. MAC had tried to branch out into perfume from 1999-2009 but for some reason I haven’t been able to determine why; they gave up on it. Especially because the 2002 releases MV1, MV2, and MV3 were very well-done department store releases. For the end of 2016 MAC is re-entering the perfume market with a collection of six new releases called Shadescents.

Karyn Khoury

The inspiration behind Shadescents are the six-current best-selling MAC lipstick shades. The color of the bottle cap matches the shade of lipstick in the name. What especially got my attention was the collaboration between creative director Karyn Khoury and perfumer Jerome Epinette who were the team behind all six. The concept was to create a perfume version of lipstick. What that meant was not to smell like lipstick but instead for each perfume to be one distinct note or accord which best represented the color. I will confess that I am not one of those synesthetes who sees color when I smell perfume which means I will not comment on whether I think the perfumes succeed on that level. Where I do think they achieve their goals is to take a bold single note and treat it as a soliflore which M. Epinette can surround with some complimentary notes.

Jerome-Epinette

Jerome Epinette

Candy Yum-Yum is a candy floss blast of ethyl maltol with vanilla cut with a set of interesting fruit notes. Crème D’Nude also is based around vanilla but in this case a set of botanical and synthetic musks wrap themselves around the sweet core. Velvet Teddy is also musky but matched with honey. Lady Danger uses cherry as the focal point. My Heroine was the one which did not seem to belong because it is a smoky resinous leather. The one I liked best is the one based on the most popular MAC lipstick shade Ruby Woo.

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Ruby Woo actually picks up on the themes from Lady Danger and My Heroine as there is cherry and what M. Epinette calls a “red leather accord”. It opens with a kind of patent leather accord which is pierced with a strong cherry which I think is what is meant to give it its crimson shade. M. Epinette then uses as highlighting notes; saffron, iris, rose, and sandalwood. These four notes take the red leather jacket on a lively journey by the time all is said and done.

Ruby Woo has 10-12 hour longevity and above average sillage.

If one of the reasons for MAC getting out of the perfume business seven years ago, was they took too many chances. I believe Shadescents is an attempt to rectify that perceived error. All six have identifiable aesthetics similar to many of their mass-market brethren. The collection as a whole provides enough difference that I think it will resonate with the MAC consumer. I’m not a MAC consumer but I would happily wear Ruby Woo.

Disclosure: This review was based on samples provided by Macy’s.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Byredo La Botte- Lipstick & Leather

I have written a lot about my affection for the different leather accords and fragrances. As I move further in to my second decade of writing about perfume the whole concept of leather in perfumes has yet to become uninteresting to me. One reason is there are so many versions of leather in the world to use as inspiration.

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Ben Gorham

Ben Gorham the owner-creative director behind Byredo also is inspired by leather in the latest releases for the Night Veils collection. In the first trio released last year it was night-blooming flowers which were the raison d’etre. This trio is all about the difference in leather from the glove, Le Gant, to the saddle, La Selle, and the boot, La Botte. All were composed by perfumer Jerome Epinette. La Selle does a fantastic job of capturing the tack room bracketing the leather accord with black tea and birch. The one which captured my attention was La Botte.

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Dita von Teese (Not Mistress Stephanie)

When I was a young man I was doing what callow young men did; I let it be known I was exploring my sexuality. I wanted to try everything on the spectrum. In hindsight, I know that the whole attitude was pose more than real introspection. In that arrogantly stupid frame of mind I cajoled an invitation to an underground S&M club. On the night I attended I received an education from one Mistress Stephanie who did not use anything to lash me but her tongue. She derisively called me a tourist more repressed than someone afraid to come through the door. She continued to take out my hypocrisy and examine it until I understood it. What does this have to do with perfume? Well Mistress Stephanie was powdered and wore a many layered coating of vermillion lipstick. As she spoke to me the scents of the powder and lipstick mingled with the leather of her knee-high brilliantly polished boots. As with so many times in my life that co-mingling of smells is attached to that moment of education. La Botte is that perfume.

Jerome-Epinette

Jerome Epinette

M. Epinette uses a mixture of jasmine and violet to form that powdery cosmetic accord. Then M. Epinette uses Civettone to make the bridge to the leather accord. Civettone is the chemical in the highest concentration in natural civet. When isolated it imparts a cleaner animalic character. M. Epinette takes advantage of that to lead down to his highly polished leather accord. This is high gloss leather and it is made to sparkle with the addition of mahogany wood. It forms a fascinating animalic effect that I could not get enough of.

La Botte has 12-14 hour longevity and below average sillage because of its extrait strength.

Even though I fell for La Botte I think highly of the other two in this trio of Night Veils. As a collection, they allow for M. Epinette to offer you three different perspectives on leather. I just preferred the one which took me back to a teachable moment in time.

Disclosure: this review was based on a sample provided by Byredo.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Vilhelm Parfumerie Dirty Velvet- Latin Quarter Vibrations

The last of the Vilhelm Parfumerie Fall 2016 collection has been released. I have admired all three of these perfumes as they show a brand expanding their offerings with intent. Creative director Jan Ahlgren and perfumer Jerome Epinette have collaborated well and this collection shows the working relationship is top notch. With the latest release Dirty Velvet they finish 2016 on a high note.

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Jan Ahlgren

M. Ahlgren has been treating us to olfactory interpretations of his favorite places in Paris. With Dirty Velvet he was inspired by his preferred hotel in the City of Light, Villa D’Estrees. The hotel itself sits on the edge of the Latin Quarter where the Sorbonne and many other universities within Paris are located. The conjunction of college life within one of the great cities of the world almost always produces a section of the city which is lively. Not sure why M. Ahlgren likes this part of Paris so much but Dirty Velvet captures the vibe of the Quartier Latin.

Jerome-Epinette

Jerome Epinette

M. Epinette starts off with pomelo which provides a muted tartness that sharpens its focus over time. It leads into a rich tobacco leaf. This is the deeply narcotic with a hint of menthol kind of tobacco. M. Epinette then matches a fig accord which focuses mainly on the ripe fruit with sparkles of green. This is a rich opulent accord that becomes even better as sandalwood and vetiver come into play. The sandalwood provides a dry woody platform for the tobacco and fig to rest upon. The vetiver picks out the threads of green making them more prominent. The final piece of the puzzle is a salty skin accord. This is where it all stays together for hours.

Dirty Velvet has 10-12 hour longevity and moderate sillage.

I have tried four Vilhelm Parfumerie releases this year. I have enjoyed this minimalist architecture M. Ahlgren and M. Epinette have created. It allows for well-chosen raw materials to stand out. This is a technique M. Epinette has become very adept with. Dirty Velvet is my favorite of this year’s offerings because it goes deeper than any of the previous releases I’ve tried from Vilhelm Parfumerie. Once it comes together, about an hour in, the final mix is just a pleasure to be surrounded by.

Disclosure: this review was based on a sample provided by Vilhelm Parfumerie.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Atelier Cologne Citron D’Erable- Maple Syrup Salute

There are certain rules which are universally accepted. No wearing white after Labor Day. Red wine with meat; white wine with fish. Citrus perfumes are for warm weather. When you look at that list you realize that they are generally true but it is in the exceptions that you find creative thinking. Some of my favorite citrus fragrances come from Atelier Cologne but even those are usually worn when the temperature rises. Slowly but surely brands have been providing citrus perfumes which can break this adage. Atelier Cologne has turned this trick with the release of Citron D’Erable.

Citron D’Erable is part of the Collection Azur but it is currently only available in Canadian Sephora and at Atelier Cologne boutiques. One of the things I liked about the first four releases within Collection Azur was they felt like an evolution of the brand’s cologne absolue aesthetic. Citron D’Erable is very much part of that ongoing refinement. Citron D’Erable translates to “Maple Citrus”. As an homage to Canada that is an appropriate mixture of the trademark citrus of Atelier Cologne with one of the symbols of the country. Perfumer Jerome Epinette is back for his twenty-third composition for the brand.

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Citron D'Erable postcard from Atelier Cologne

Maple Syrup is harvested in the spring as the temperature begins to fluctuate between below freezing nights and sunny warm days. The back and forth causes the sap to flow and be collected via a tap placed into the tree itself. M. Epinette combines that early spring sunshine, the wood of the maple tree, and the syrup flowing from the tap.

M. Epinette uses lemon to represent the lower hanging sun of the spring. He modulates it with Szechuan pepper. This has been an ingredient I have seen used a lot over the last year to modify some of the more incandescent notes. M. Epinette uses it in exactly this way here. Then we get to the tree itself where we see the cut in the wood with the maple syrup flowing in a steady stream. The syrup accord is given lift by a very intelligently chosen eucalyptus. If you’ve ever smelled fresh cut wood it has a mentholated undertone. The eucalyptus represents that as well as the chilly air you are breathing in. It is here as a grace note which feels perfect. To represent the tree M. Epinette takes maple wood oil and, as with the lemon on top, transforms it with cedar, sandalwood, and sequoia wood. This is done to make a more impressionistic maple tree accord instead of working towards something photorealistic.

Citron D’Erable has 10-12 hour longevity and average sillage.

Citron D’Erable is my favorite of the Atelier Cologne releases in 2016. It is going to get a lot of wear throughout the harvest season because it will shine there as much as when the spring thaw is happening. For at least the next few weeks I am going to be breaking my citrus perfume in warm weather rule with a snappy maple syrup salute to our neighbors to the north courtesy of Citron D’Erable.

Disclosure: This review was based on a press sample supplied by Atelier Cologne.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Vilhelm Parfumerie Purple Fig- A Fig Tree Grows in Paris

When it comes to the inspiration for the releases coming from the Vilhelm Parfumerie brand I must give a hat tip to founder and creative director Jan Ahlgren. In more than a few of the perfumes the story which goes along with it has been equally engaging. Such is the case for the newest release Purple Fig.

jan ahlgren

Jan Ahlgren

One of the marvelous things about walking around any European city is finding these odd alleyways which give you a true insight into a city; more so than seeing another museum or historical site. In the 11th Arrondissement you might have been visiting the Place de La Republique and told to head to the Oberkampf district to find some nightlife. If you misheard and instead find the Rue Oberkampf you will find yourself in this urban verdant-lined oasis called Cite du Figuier. The entire small alley way has growing things and near the middle is a lone fig tree. It is this which M. Ahlgren asked his partner in fragrance, perfumer Jerome Epinette, to interpret.

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Cite du Figuier

M. Epinette and M. Ahlgren have designed something closely representing a house style over these early releases. Purple Fig is the thirteenth and it follows the same as the previous having three distinct chords of two notes. Now before we go any further if the name has you excited about a figgy perfume look at that picture of Cite du Figuier above and realize this is much more about the green. For Purple Fig M. Epinette has created a sunny autumn stroll down the Cite du Figuier.

Jerome-Epinette

Jerome Epinette

M. Epinette uses a brilliant lemon given weight by angelica seed which imparts a botanical musk to make this less ebullient. This is the way I see the sun on an autumn day when it hangs a little lower in the sky. It is bright without being blindingly so. Then in the heart M. Epinette matches cyclamen and stemone to create a green chord. It is watery, the remaining moments of the angelica seeds provides a slight hint of potted soil while the stemone comes as close to fig as you’ll get. It is a vibrant accord which has a hint of the stone walls of the buildings in the alleyway. The base is a green version of cedar bolstered with cypress which provides the woody missing link.

Purple Fig has 10-12 hour longevity and average sillage.

I’ll admit at first I was disappointed a perfume named Purple Fig wasn’t going to be a gigantic fig as the name portended to me. Instead M. Ahlgren and M. Epinette took me on one of those offbeat journeys I so enjoy to find where a fig tree grows in Paris.

Disclosure: This review was based on a sample provided by Vilhelm Parfumerie.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Byredo Unnamed- Figure It Out

As I think is apparent for those who read me regularly I am all about the perfume. I rarely comment on the bottle or the marketing campaign because I am all about what I wear on my skin. So far the PR or the bottle have never managed to make it out the door with me. Most of the time it is white noise to me. Except sometimes it is so precious it makes me cringe a bit. This was how I approached the new Byredo Unnamed.

ben gorham

Ben Gorham

Byredo Unnamed is meant to represent the tenth anniversary of the brand. For this occasion, owner and creative director Ben Gorham decided it would be interesting to leave the name off and give those who purchase a bottle a sheet of stick-on letters so you can give it your own name. There is a page on the Byredo website with pictures of the various names people have put on their bottle. It looks like a deranged Pinterest page of narcissists. The concept was so irritating I wanted to skip the whole thing; but the perfume inside the nonsense is really good around a heart of two of my favorite notes orris and violet.

Jerome-Epinette

Jerome Epinette

Mr. Gorham once again works with perfumer Jerome Epinette. This is a culmination of this unbroken partnership which has spanned 32 fragrances making Unnamed the thirty-third. They have produced some truly beautiful perfumes. Byredo is a place where M. Epinette often has the chance to display a new isolation of a natural source. It is what has made me enjoy so many of these releases over the last few years. Unnamed continues this trend.

Usually when one celebrates you pop a bottle of champagne. Apparently around the Byredo offices gin must be the alcohol of choice for celebrations because that is where Unnamed begins. M. Epinette provides a chilly gin accord matched with some pink pepper floating around. The gin pops like a dry martini. This then leads to the heart where M. Epinette uses a full spectrum violet joined with an orris fraction called “orris stem”. This is a powder-free isolate focused on the earthy rooty quality with a fascinating green thread running through it. With a more florid violet it provides a foundation for that exuberance to expand upon. The base is a leather accord made up of balsamic components, moss, cashmeran, and musk. It provides a bit of rough-hewn leatheriness to finish things.

Unnamed has 10-12 hour longevity and average sillage.

Unnamed is a fitting exemplar of what Byredo has done well the past ten years. It also feels like a nice congratulatory pat on the back between Mr. Gorham and M. Epinette. I like it quite a bit. As for a name? I’ll let others figure it out.

Disclosure: This review was based on a sample provided by Byredo.

Mark Behnke

New Perfume Review Vilhelm Modest Mimosa- Straight to the Heart

When I visited Robertet I was very impressed with the number of fractions they take of various raw materials. For those who aren’t familiar a fraction is a smaller temperature range collected during final distillation forming a different scent profile. Depending on when it is collected it can have very different characteristics. One part of this group of raw materials were the ones named “Coeur”; French for heart. As you might intimate from that it is the oil collected within a few degrees of the very center of the distillation temperature range. What you also might expect is this is the most authentic version of a particular raw material. What I found was with some of the nuanced character distilled away in front of and behind it the “Coeur” was not just a more focused version it also draws your attention to certain aspects easier to overlook in the unfractionated essential oil. The new Vilhelm Modest Mimosa uses Mimosa Coeur in a stunning way.

jan ahlgren

Jan Ahlgren

Creative director Jan Ahlgren has been working with perfumer Jerome Epinette since the inception of the brand last year. It has been a prolific partnership with Modest Mimosa the twelfth release with two more to come before the end of the year. What is becoming the typical Vilhelm architecture is three phases of two notes. This does require that those few notes provide something memorable to elevate the fragrance overall.

Jerome-Epinette

Jerome Epinette

Modest Mimosa opens with neroli and carrot. This is the second time this year a perfume has opened with this and I have been taken with it both times. The neroli has some transparent green qualities which mesh extremely well with the earthy rootiness of the carrot. There is a sun-warmed quality to these notes when they are paired. Then the Mimosa Coeur comes out. As the heart of mimosa the green facets and the slightly woody components have been distilled away. What is left is the most delicate creamy indolic white flower. M. Epinette then chooses violet to prop up the mimosa Coeur with its slightly sugared sweet floral nature. This all ends on a foundation of refined leather and what is called “salt musk” in the notes. What that means is one of those white musks that imparts a slightly ozonic quality as well. In the case of Modest Mimosa it adds expansiveness to the leather while subtly deepening the animalicness of it all.

Modest Mimosa has 12-14 hour longevity and average sillage.

2016 has had more than its fair share of excellent mimosa perfumes this year. What is nice about these different interpretations is each is distinct. Modest Mimosa’s comes from going straight to the heart of it all.

Disclosure: This review was based on a sample provided by Vilhelm.

Mark Behnke

Flanker Round-Up: Kenneth Cole Black Bold, Bulgari Rose Goldea, Anna Sui Romantica Exotica, & Giorgio Armani Si Le Parfum

I am sitting here with a desk overflowing with samples. As I was attempting to organize them I was pooling all of the flankers in one stack. As I was doing this I noticed there were four new versions of perfumes of which I liked their original iteration. I have infrequently done a round-up of flankers when I think there is something worth mentioning. I did not give these perfumes which I will write about below my typical two days of wearing. These all got the same day and about the same amount of territory on my two forearms. They were not enough alike that it did set up a bit of olfactory cacophony but I do think I learned enough to make some broad assessments.

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Kenneth Cole Black Bold- The original Kenneth Cole Black is one of those great workhorse masculine fougeres which is probably underrated. Perfumer Harry Fremont did Black and he has returned to do Black Bold. As almost all flankers do they keep the basic structure of the original in place and either pump up one of the supporting notes or add an extra one in. Here M. Fremont enhances the mint in the top accord so it is more prominent. It adds a cooling effect to the ginger and basil with which it is matched. The bold is a big slug of oak in the leather focused base. The oak roughs up the smooth leather and for someone wanting a bolder version of Black I think Black Bold does that.

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Bulgari Rose Goldea– I really liked last year’s Goldea for the way perfumer Alberto Morillas used his supernatural skill with musks to create a unique mainstream release. Rose Goldea feels like what happens when you release something different; the brand asks for something more conventional. M. Morillas provides a very classic rose focused fragrance bracketed with sandalwood and incense. He couldn’t keep the musks entirely out and they appear in the base providing the similar golden glow they do in the original. I preferred the strong musk thread which ran through the original. If you wanted a lot less musks and more floral, Rose Goldea might do.

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Anna Sui Romantica Exotica– I was not a fan of last year’s Romantica it was an overheated fruity floral that I could barely stand on a strip. A change of perfumer also gave a change in style as Jerome Epinette likes to work in more focused accords with clear connections. Romantica Exotica moves from a crisp blood orange and lemon top to an orange blossom and gardenia heart. Cottonwood and sandalwood provide the base accord. Of the four things I had on this was the one that almost got another day of wear out of me.

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Giorgio Armani Si Le Parfum– The latest Giorgio Armani release to turn into a sea of flankers is 2013’s Si Eau de Parfum. It has been a pretty bleak grouping as the main thing which was altered was the concentration of the rose de mai focal point. I never understand who these kind of flankers are meant to entice. With the new Si Le Parfum perfumer Julie Masse, who worked on the original with Christine Nagel, makes a massive change from rose de mai to osmanthus in the heart. Almost everything else is the same cassis and vanilla top; amber and labdanum base. The heart is transformed as osmanthus steps up with its leathery apricot quality and wraps the patchouli, benzoin, and jasmine into something that does resemble the desired modern chypre accord. This is the most different of the four from the original because Mme Masse massively reworks the heart accord; for the better.

Disclosure: This review was based on samples provided by the perfume brands.

Mark Behnke