New Perfume Review Elizabeth Arden Green Tea Fig- Darn Good

I was in Macy’s a few weeks ago and I was talking with the fragrance manager. In a not uncommon occurrence for me there were a group of three young women trying something on their skin. As the scent made its way to me I realized I liked it. Once the women moved on I asked what it was. When I read the name on the bottle I realized I had been ignoring a line of flankers I probably shouldn’t have been. Elizabeth Arden Green Tea Fig is going to fix that problem.

In 1999 when the original Elizabeth Arden Green Tea was released it was an example of what the brand does well. Catching a hold of a trend and making it fresh and sparkling. This was also one of perfumer Francis Kurkdjian’s early examples of the aesthetic we would come to know. Starting in 2001 there has been an annual flanker which has added a new ingredient into the mix. I can’t remember trying any of those. I had become a horrible niche snob by that point, so I probably turned my nose up at them and moved on to something I thought was more interesting. Until my recent visit to the mall.

Rodrigo Flores-Roux

Since 2008 perfumer Rodrogo Flores-Roux has overseen the annual Green Tea flankers. I can’t speak for what has been done previously but for Green Tea Fig the mention of the fig is not just a throwaway gesture in the name. In this case the fig stands up and makes this stand out.

Sr. Flores-Roux opens with the fresh citrus top accord like the original. The fig makes its presence known soon after. There are many types of fig accords in perfumery. The one used here is a green fig. It has more of the leafiness and less of the pulpy lushness of the riper accord. It is the right choice to harmonize with the green tea accord in the heart. This is what caught my attention across the fragrance counter. The unripe fig and the astringent green tea are lovely together. Sr. Flores-Roux adds in grace notes of almond and clary sage to provide a connection to the soft woody finish along with some musks.

Green Tea Fig has 8-10 hour longevity and average sillage.

I need to keep reminding myself that in the more moderately priced sector in the department store there are some well-executed examples of perfume. They may not be trendsetters, or terribly original, but they can be darn good; Green Tea Fig is a reminder of that.

Disclosure: This review is based on a sample I received from Macy’s

Mark Behnke